Nuit

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Predefinição:Egyptiangods

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History

In Egyptian mythology, Nuit was the sky goddess, in contrast to most other mythologies, where the Sky Father is nearly always male. Nuit is a daughter of Shu and Tefnut. She was one of the Ennead.

The sun god Ra entered her mouth after the sun set in the evening and was reborn from her vulva the next morning. She also swallowed and rebirthed the stars.

She was a goddess of death, and her image is on the inside of most sarcophagi. The pharaoh entered her body after death and was later resurrected.

In art, Nuit is depicted as a woman wearing no clothes, covered with stars and supported by Shu; opposite her (the sky), is her husband, Seb (the Earth). With Seb, she was the mother of Osiris, Horus, Isis, Set, and Nephthys.

Alternatives: Nu, Nut

Nuit & Thelema

Nuit is the main speaker in the first chapter of the Book of the Law and the feminine compliment to the deity Hadit. Nuit is the infinitely vast circle whose circumference is unmeasurable and whose center is everywhere. Hadit is the infinitely small point within the core of every single thing. The union of the two is yet another glyph of the Great Work.

References

  • Wikipedia (2004). Nuit. Retrieved Oct. 19, 2004.